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Table 5 Drug-related problems derived from randomly selected antibacterial prescriptions for outpatients

From: An outpatient antibacterial stewardship intervention during the journey to JCI accreditation

Indicators First phase Second phase
(March, 2012) (March, 2013)
Number of randomly selected antibacterial prescriptions for outpatients* 559 446
Number of DRPs 76 18
Occurrence rate of DRPS# 13.6% 4.0%
Occurrence rate of DRPs made by surgeons∆# 19.5% 5.6%
Occurrence rate of DRPs made by internal medicine physicians# 8.4% 2.8%
Occurrence rate of each subtype of DRP   
(1) Inappropriate coadministration with non-antibacterials 4 (0.7%) 6 (1.3%)
(2) Inappropriate co-medication with other antibacterials# 17 (3.0%) 3 (0.7%)
(3) Inappropriate dosing frequency 8 (1.4%) 3 (0.7%)
(4) Inappropriate dose 1 (0.2%) 2 (0.4%)
(5) Inappropriate administration route 1 (0.2%) 0
(6) Use beyond approved indications 1 (0.2%) 2 (0.4%)
(7) Discordance between diagnosis and purpose of medication use 8 (1.4%) 2 (0.4%)
(8) Mismatches between antibacterial spectrum and the patient’s infection# 15 (2.7%) 0
(9) Abuse of i.v. medications instead of oral alternatives# 16 (2.9%) 0
(10) No diluent for i.v. antibacterials 1 (0.2%) 0
(11) Ignorance of patient’s other diseases 4 (0.7%) 0
  1. Notes: # P < 0.01 (first phase vs second phase). P < 0.01 (surgeons vs internal medicine physicians). Differences between two groups were tested for statistical significance using Pearson’s Chi-square test. A P value < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. A P value < 0.01 was considered to be highly significant. DRPs: drug-related problems.